Gíjon – Magical Town…

Our distant impression of Gíjon from various readings & conversations was that it was a seriously heavy industrial port town & maybe not worth a visit, but we had heard from several good friends that Gíjon was mos def worth a visit. These were friends who had lived & spent a chunk of time in Gíjon and, we assumed, they knew of what they spoke. So as part of our return trip to our fave area of Asturias, we put it on the list…

La Galana…Not So Galamorous – Looks Good But Pulpo Tough and My Fabada Vey Weak on Flavour…

We broke up our long Land Rover drive with a brief stop in Noja and pretty much have nothing to report…so on to Gíjon to arrive in a pissing down chubasco (rain storm) & struggling to find a park. But we did, and then zigged & zagged our way to our AirBnB flat that was strategically located in primo territory (Cimavilla). After a warm welcome by our hosts, we headed out with Billie in tow to luckily find a break in the weather! We made a bee line for the Plaza Mayor with a wee bit of hunger & thirst on the burn & several folks had put in a good word for La Galana, so it was our first port of call. This place was the definition of style over substance – staff were surly & rude, prices a tad on the high side and the food was more than a few steps below average. Hoping things would improve…

Gíjon Street Scenes…

Coastal Park Near our AirBnB flat in the Cimavilla Barrio…with a sculpture by Eduardo Chillida

Our AirBnB flat was located within a 3-4 minute walk to the coastal park of Cerro de Santa Catalina which suited Billie to a ‘T’ for his early morning piss & poo walk. Stunning 360 degree views capped off by a wonderful Eduardo Chillida sculpture titled ‘Elogio del Horizonte‘.  Billie was very impressed…

It being Saturday, and Gíjon having a reputably damn decent mercado, we made a bee line for the Mercado del Sur to stock up for our coming days of camping by the sea at Camping Troenzo. And boy did we score! We’d made a list of special Asturias items that needed to make it into our basket & we found several stalls that were packed to the gills with our desired delectable items. By pure accident, we did most of our procurement at a deli stall called Pimienta y Perejil (Pepper and Parsley) that many folks outside the market and post our visit said was THE BEST. The man knew his Asturias products like…well, an Asturian deli expert, so we grabbed some jabalí (wild boar) chorizo, some Cabrales queso and some fat & big Asturias white beans.

Awesome Mercado del Sur - Snagged some excellent jabalí (wild boar) chorizo, cheeses (Asturias is famous for dairy & cheese) & beans!

Mercado del Sur – Gíjon’s Major Market…Snagged some excellent jabalí (wild boar) chorizo, cheeses (Asturias is famous for dairy & cheese) & beans!

And as luck would have it, the monthly artisan market was on for that very Saturday – double score. We picked up some more Asturias queso de cabra cheese and some primo cecina from the Gancedo stall — all organic, all home grown, all in the family and free range.

Artisan Market in Plaza Mayor…

And if our supply shopping could not get any better, in the barrio del Carmen we chanced across Coalla, Spain’s version of the famed US of A’s Dean & Deluca. This joint was a taste & smell sensation – our camping pantry was now past fulll…

Coalla – The Spanish Version of Dean & Deluca…Impressive.

As we edged into our Saturday night, one thing we needed to continue to continue ticking off was a decent taste of ciders as Asturias and the Basque Country are THE makers of Spanish cider. So just round the corner from our flat was La Tabacalera which suited all our minimal requirements just fine – it was a sideria and they had cider.

Sideria La Tabacalera…Top Left: 1st Cider of the night, Zapica; Hound #2 Gets In Some Pouring Practice; Chorizo in Cider; Marinated & Spicy Olives; Da Place…

In most other parts of Spain it is quite customary to just order a glass of cider, but in Asturias you have to have the whole bottle. Not too potent @ 6% or so on the alcohol scale, but it does sneak up on you. Asturias is also one of the provinces where a free pintxo comes with your drink…here we were first plied with some spicy, garlic olives. But our hunger was a tad bigger than that so we put in a racion order for sauteed chorizo with, of course, cider!

Way Cool Bar – La Vida Alegre…

Our next destination was the barrio (neighbourhood) del Carmen which our good mate Terra had tipped us off as THE COOL & HOT area of Gíjon, chocka full of bars, restaurants, cafes & stores. And she was spot on…

We started with a wee cerveza rest stop outdoors @ La Vida Alegre (The happy or joyful life) and enjoyed the excellent people watching as the Saturday night crowds began to stuff the streets….

Hop’nest Bar of the Night – Turnedo! Top Left: One of our 3 Free Pintxos @ Turnedo; Outside View; Excellent Vino Selections; Da Crowds; Menus…

Then it was on to Vinatería Turnedo – now this was the definition of popular…but even though super busy, the staff was more than up to the challenge with quick service and always with a smile.

Yawn…More Bars…Tough Life.

Tierra Astur – More Cider!

Almost happy that Saturday night came to an end – our heads & livers thanked us…so up early & in need of a decent, pre-leaving-Gíjon-coffee we had only one choice – Raw Coco, who’s acquaintance we’d made the previous morning. And it was a case of déjà vu too with the same order of two cafe con leches & a slice of sinful carrot cake.

Raw Coco – Fave, fave Cafe

So we waved a sad goodbye to Gíjon, but we were not too sad as we were heading  for a lunchtime rendezvous @ Casa Juanín…

 

Advertisements

Lunch @ Casa Juanín in the Asturian Mountains…

 

Ah, Glorious Asturias…

After a gloriously fun weekend in Gíjon (post coming up soon), we packed up the Land Rover on a brilliant Sunday morning (after a superb coffee @ Raw Coco) and toddled our way towards the pueblo of Pendones…to have lunch at Casa Juanín.

On The Road to Lunch @ Casa Juanín: Top Left – Co-pilot Billie on the job; Río Nalón; Wet Pooch; Spring Pooch in the Wild Flowers: Fix’r Upper & Roman Tower

It being a stunner of a day & we had a little extra time on our hands, and Billie needed a piss stop, we pulled over in the wee village of Condado for a riverside walk. The River Nalón flows through this valley and is reported by several sources to be a very fine trout river. There are two dams (that I know of) on the River Nalón which make it, like a lot of rivers in the world, a tailwater fishery which is both good and bad. The good is that it tends to keep the water temperatures relatively constant and it also helps to prevent severe flooding. The bad is that it can also seriously muck around with the water flows when summertime irrigation extraction hits full bore. Billie had a nice dip, a pee and a run through a wildflower meadow but we saw no trouts….sweet water though.

Casa Juanín, Pendones, Asturias

We had read about Casa Juanín (you can also read about it here in an extract from the Guardian) in a recent book purchase of mine by author Matt Goulding called Grape, Olive, Pig, and thought it special enough to make a modest inland detour for a Sunday menú del día lunch.

Top: Front Of House with Chilled Cerveza; Me & Juanín (he’s 83!); Our Table View…

We arrived promptly (being American & English) at our reservation time of 1pm, but were quickly handed 2 cold beers & told lunch started sometime after 1:30 or maybe closer to 2. No pasa nada…being so early we were able to snag the best outside table and slowly sip our refreshing beverages. Juanín came out to set our table and we had a very nice chat with him and he told us the secret to a long life (he’s 83!) – work! He not only does the restaurant with his daughter Isabel, but also has a herd of cows and goats that he keeps. He told us the pueblo of Pendones only has 15 or so inhabitants in the winter and that the winter can be very tough – now that’s an understatement.

As time slipped by, more & more folks began to appear & for the most part they disappeared inside Casa Juanín. Hmmmm? At 2pm I was sent in to see if I could get the menu for the day, so I asked Juanín who looked a bit perplexed, but soon his daughter Isabel (the chef) appeared at the door & voila! – a menu appeared.

We did a quick perusal, made our 1st plate, 2nd plate & dessert choices & Hound #2 was sent in to place the order…well it seems that the printed menu bears little resemblance to what is on offer, so Hound #2 made some rapid on-the-spot decisions but upon her return table side, she confessed she really did not know what we were eating except the roasted goat.

Top Left: Jabalí (Wild Boar) & Bean (Alubia) Stew; Dining Al Fresco; Bowl of the Good Stuff; Cider!

Quick to the table was our ordered bottle of Asturian cider (Asturias & the Basque Country are THE cider making regions in Spain but very different styles) – yum. Then came a big, steaming bowl of jabalí (wild boar) & alubias stew (Asturias is famous for its big, white beans which go into a traditional dish called fabada) which was promptly dished out & scooped up & devoured. Super rich in flavour, a silky texture with chunky hunks of wild boar…Clean bowls went back to the kitchen….

Top Left: Pre-meal Table; Plated Roasted Goat & Taters; Full Plate of House Raised Roasted Cabrito, Potatoes & Red Peppers

Next in the queue was cabrito asado (roasted goat with potato & peppers), in fact we got Juanín’s goat so to speak, just kidding…beautiful, tender as, succulent & juicy, packed with flavour, crispy as skin and heaps of it. After we pretty much stripped the massive serving bare, Juanín came out and said ‘¿Más?” (More?) to which the only answer was “Nada más!” – (Nothing more!). We thought if we’d kept answering ‘yes’ food would just have kept coming & coming…

Dessert With A View…Homemade Goat’s Cheese with Apple Paste; The Best Cheesecake Ever

With only a smidgen of room left in our gullets, we made our dessert choices – cheesecake for me & some of Juanín’s own goat cheese with fruit paste for Hound #2, who decidedly declared mine the winner by a long shot. We spent another leisurely half an hour enjoying the bright, oh so sunny oh so warm day & letting our stuffed to the gills stomachs digest…and then we asked for the bill. Qué chollo (what a deal)!!! Total damage came to 34 euros for 2 beers, bottle of cider, bowl of jabalí & alubia stew, gigantic plate of roasted local goat and dessert!

So folks, if you happen by chance to be wandering the backroads of the mountains of Asturias, drop a pin on your Google map for Casa Juanín – you will not be disappointed  & say howdy to Juanín and Isabel for us…

Fly Fishing Asturias & Cantabria…


We recently went on our second big adventure to lovely Asturias where Hounds #1 & #2 planned to hit the beaches while I thrashed a bit of Spanish water in search of trout. Asturias can be a tough fish, as many of the rivers close to the coast are also classified as highly prized salmon rivers for which the permits or licenses are obtained via a lottery system that you had to have put your name in the ‘hat’ the previous October. And, as they should, they heavily favour locals. And in some of my own research into Asturian rivers I found that for every 100 salmon beats you will typically find only 4 or 5 trout beats, often on wee tributaries (most likely dried up in mid to late summer) to the real deal like the Rivers Deva or Cares or Sella. And given I only had 2 or 3 days to fish, I made an executive decision to hire a guide to cut to the quick & catch some trouts rather than fritter my time away in search of elusive river access & fish. I chose Oscar at A Mosca Cantabria and he was estupendo! Hard to go wrong with Spain’s two time World Champion (been in to top 4 four times and placed in the top 10 every year for the past 10 years) and a guide with extensive and intimate knowledge of the rivers, their current conditions and, most importantly, where the trout are.

As we head into our final stretch of time here in Spain, I am trying to squeeze in as much fly fishing on Spanish rivers as is humanly possible. I am now the proud owner (sort of) of 6 fishing licenses as you need one for any or all of the Spanish provinces that you want to fish (if you are a Spanish native you can obtain a multi-province license which covers I think 7). I am thinking about writing an article on the Spanish fishing license debacle as it is as close to Hell on Earth as you can get…

Some of the Trouts Caught in the Deva via Czech/Spanish Nymphing and Dry Fly & Dropper

When Oscar picked me up for our first outing, he explained that given the VERY mild winter where there was virtually no snow, combined with an extremely dry Spring in Cantabria and Asturias, that many of the rivers he wanted to fish had seriously low water levels and were close to unfishable. So his plan for the day was to head to the pueblo of Potes near the Picos de Europa to fish a catch & release section of the River Deva. The Deva’s source is in the Picos de Europa where the high valley that the Deva originates from actually faces South. The South had had a decent amount of rain recently so the Deva’s level and flow were good.

We rigged up 2 rods – one for Czech/Spanish nymphing and another as a dry fly & nymph dropper. As most fly fishing folks know, to say the Czech/Spanish/French nymphing technique is productive is truly the definition of an understatement. We soon had a posse of trout to the net but as we cruised into the afternoon we made the decision to: (a) head a wee bit farther out of Potes, up river for a less urban/more wild setting and (b) to have lunch.

Río Deva, near Potes, Asturias: Top Left – Me; Guide Oscar & Mate Dario; High Mountain Flows of the Deva

After a couple of hours or so fishing the upper Deva stretch (with some success), Oscar decided we should head 45 minutes due East to the river Nansa where as early to mid evening rolled in, the Big Boys came out to feed. We arrived at the river bank shortly after 8PM and scanned the river for any activity. Not much to see but Oscar said it usually kicks off into high feeding gear just after 9PM.

And almost like a trout alarm clock, when the face of my watch registered 9:15 the sips & sucks began to happen. Big sucks and sips…clearly gulps. But the trout were clearly wary from fishing pressure – I had one decent take but my reaction time @ 9:30-9:45pm was a tad slow & the Spanish trout are VERY, VERY quick, so no Big Boy prize…

The next day the weather turned ugly as it was forecast to be a day of rain…and more rain. And for once in their sorry forecasting lives they were 100% right. Oscar said we would head for some other stretches of the river Nansa, a bit higher up where the river was narrower with pocket water & flat stretches to fish.

River Nansa on a VERY Wet Wednesday: Top Left – Best Trout of the Day; River Nanasa & more River Nansa (Almost looks like New Zealand) and final Fish Shot.

Despite the despicable weather conditions (I was soaked to the bone), we fished and we caught some trout…and my best fish of the trip – who rose from the dark, deep water depths to a perfectly cast & drifted (if I say so myself) CDC dry tied by Oscar. Sweet fish, great fly fishing & estupendo guide Oscar – muchas gracias!