Fly Fishing Asturias & Cantabria…


We recently went on our second big adventure to lovely Asturias where Hounds #1 & #2 planned to hit the beaches while I thrashed a bit of Spanish water in search of trout. Asturias can be a tough fish, as many of the rivers close to the coast are also classified as highly prized salmon rivers for which the permits or licenses are obtained via a lottery system that you had to have put your name in the ‘hat’ the previous October. And, as they should, they heavily favour locals. And in some of my own research into Asturian rivers I found that for every 100 salmon beats you will typically find only 4 or 5 trout beats, often on wee tributaries (most likely dried up in mid to late summer) to the real deal like the Rivers Deva or Cares or Sella. And given I only had 2 or 3 days to fish, I made an executive decision to hire a guide to cut to the quick & catch some trouts rather than fritter my time away in search of elusive river access & fish. I chose Oscar at A Mosca Cantabria and he was estupendo! Hard to go wrong with Spain’s two time World Champion (been in to top 4 four times and placed in the top 10 every year for the past 10 years) and a guide with extensive and intimate knowledge of the rivers, their current conditions and, most importantly, where the trout are.

As we head into our final stretch of time here in Spain, I am trying to squeeze in as much fly fishing on Spanish rivers as is humanly possible. I am now the proud owner (sort of) of 6 fishing licenses as you need one for any or all of the Spanish provinces that you want to fish (if you are a Spanish native you can obtain a multi-province license which covers I think 7). I am thinking about writing an article on the Spanish fishing license debacle as it is as close to Hell on Earth as you can get…

Some of the Trouts Caught in the Deva via Czech/Spanish Nymphing and Dry Fly & Dropper

When Oscar picked me up for our first outing, he explained that given the VERY mild winter where there was virtually no snow, combined with an extremely dry Spring in Cantabria and Asturias, that many of the rivers he wanted to fish had seriously low water levels and were close to unfishable. So his plan for the day was to head to the pueblo of Potes near the Picos de Europa to fish a catch & release section of the River Deva. The Deva’s source is in the Picos de Europa where the high valley that the Deva originates from actually faces South. The South had had a decent amount of rain recently so the Deva’s level and flow were good.

We rigged up 2 rods – one for Czech/Spanish nymphing and another as a dry fly & nymph dropper. As most fly fishing folks know, to say the Czech/Spanish/French nymphing technique is productive is truly the definition of an understatement. We soon had a posse of trout to the net but as we cruised into the afternoon we made the decision to: (a) head a wee bit farther out of Potes, up river for a less urban/more wild setting and (b) to have lunch.

Río Deva, near Potes, Asturias: Top Left – Me; Guide Oscar & Mate Dario; High Mountain Flows of the Deva

After a couple of hours or so fishing the upper Deva stretch (with some success), Oscar decided we should head 45 minutes due East to the river Nansa where as early to mid evening rolled in, the Big Boys came out to feed. We arrived at the river bank shortly after 8PM and scanned the river for any activity. Not much to see but Oscar said it usually kicks off into high feeding gear just after 9PM.

And almost like a trout alarm clock, when the face of my watch registered 9:15 the sips & sucks began to happen. Big sucks and sips…clearly gulps. But the trout were clearly wary from fishing pressure – I had one decent take but my reaction time @ 9:30-9:45pm was a tad slow & the Spanish trout are VERY, VERY quick, so no Big Boy prize…

The next day the weather turned ugly as it was forecast to be a day of rain…and more rain. And for once in their sorry forecasting lives they were 100% right. Oscar said we would head for some other stretches of the river Nansa, a bit higher up where the river was narrower with pocket water & flat stretches to fish.

River Nansa on a VERY Wet Wednesday: Top Left – Best Trout of the Day; River Nanasa & more River Nansa (Almost looks like New Zealand) and final Fish Shot.

Despite the despicable weather conditions (I was soaked to the bone), we fished and we caught some trout…and my best fish of the trip – who rose from the dark, deep water depths to a perfectly cast & drifted (if I say so myself) CDC dry tied by Oscar. Sweet fish, great fly fishing & estupendo guide Oscar – muchas gracias!